Volume 12, Issue 4 (2021)                   JMBS 2021, 12(4): 81-94 | Back to browse issues page

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Saleki L, Homaei A, ُShayesteh F. Isolation and identification of α-amylase-producing bacteria from mangrove trees on the west coast of Qeshm Island (Konar siah) and investigation of some biochemical properties of α-amylases from Bacillus sp. HR10 and Bacillus sp. HR11. JMBS 2021; 12 (4) :81-94
URL: http://biot.modares.ac.ir/article-22-53295-en.html
1- MSc Student in Marine Biology, Department of Marine Biology, Faculty of Marine Science and Technology, Hormozgan University, Bandar Abbas, Iran
2- Associate Professor of Biochemistry, Department of Marine Biology, Faculty of Marine Science and Technology, Hormozgan University, Bandar Abbas, Iran. P.O. Box 3995, Tel.: +98 76 33711000-11; Fax: +98 76 33670716, E-mail address: a.homaei@hormozgan.ac.ir and a.homaei@gmail.com (A. Homaei). , a.homaei@hormozgan.ac.ir
3- Assistant Professor of Fisheries Science (Marine), Department of Marine Biology, Faculty of Marine Science and Technology, Hormozgan University, Bandar Abbas
Abstract:   (1605 Views)
The aim of this study was to isolate and identify a-amylase-producing bacteria present in mangrove ecosystems on Qeshm Island, Hormozgan, Iran. Samples of mangrove leaves and roots were screened for a-amylase activity using Lugol’s solution. Crude extracts were prepared of positive samples, and their a-amylase activity was determined by the Bernfeld method. The two strains with the highest activity were identified by molecular analysis of their 16S rRNA genes. a-Amylase production and activity were optimized by varying temperature and pH. 46 bacterial strains were isolated from mangrove tree leaf and root samples. Of these, 28 strains were capable of producing a-amylase. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of two strains with the highest enzyme production identified them as Bacillus sp. strain HR10 and Bacillus sp. strain HR11. The optimum temperature for enzyme production was 35 and 30 °C for strains HR10 and HR11, respectively, and the optimum pH was pH 8 for both strains. The highest enzyme activity was observed at 70 °C and 60 °C for the HR10 and HR11 strains, respectively, and the optimum pH was pH 8 for both strains. In conclusion, we have shown that bacteria isolated from mangrove leaf and root samples are potential source of a-amylases, tolerating a wide range of temperature and pH. Such a-amylases may be of interest for use in environmentally friendly industries.
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Article Type: Original Research | Subject: Microbial biotechnology
Received: 2021/06/14 | Accepted: 2021/09/4 | Published: 2022/11/28

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